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Understanding The Nin And Becoming The Ninja…

April 12, 2014

Often in our lives, we will experience moments of hardship, uncertainty and fear. These three things can often be viewed as obstacles.  Obstacles can keep us from achieving certain goals in our lives.

Elevo Dynamics is a place that teaches different ways of overcoming  challenges and finding success through determination, friendship, and mastery of oneself.

 

Many People Have A Misconception Of What It Means To Practice Ninjutsu

This art is one that teaches us about ourselves…

…the master puzzle to be solved…

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I have had people come in and say, “Ninjutsu…that is an assassins art, right?”

I always smile inside and then tell them, “No.  The true meaning of the word is ‘The art of endurance, perseverance and stealth.”  To me, “stealth” is staying invisible to the things that don’t want me to succeed.

A Ninja is defined as one who never quits. “Nin” means to endure/persevere.  That definition hardly sounds like the name of an art that teaches low-character ruffians and assassins.

Don’t you agree?  Patience is truly at the heart of the matter…

It takes a lot to become skilled at a thing…

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Recently, one of my students had to overcome his personal challenges and use the Nin concept as a means to take one step closer to his mastery of self as he blossomed into a Ninja. His name is Jack Barnes.

We hosted a Parkour seminar featuring the Tribe – an elite Parkour training group out of Washington, D.C.  I invited the group to the school to work with us on the basics of Parkour, a concept that is akin to Ninjutsu in that it also teaches people to move past obstacles without hesitation.

Parkour enthusiasts learn to overcome by mastering themselves and their relationship with their physical environments.

The Journey To Become A Ninja Has Less To Do With The External…More To Do With What Is Inside Of Us!

Jack attended this seminar.  He was 9 years old.  With the support of his family, he tried repeatedly to climb a 7-foot wall. Eventually, after several determined tries to get to the top, we added a vault box for him to use as a step.  It helped.

Once at the top of the wall, Jack was flabbergasted to find that the real challenge wasn’t the climb at all, but a battle with his inner fears.

Take a moment to watch the attached video and see Jack’s triumph!